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NC and SC Estate Planning and Elder Law Firm

Saturday, September 24, 2016

Mother Fights for Guardianship of Intellectually Disabled Daughter


How can a guardianship help protect my adult child who is unable to care for him or herself?

A South Carolina mother is struggling to regain guardianship over her daughter, who is intellectually disabled and unable to live independently.  The daughter had been sexually assaulted years prior, leading to a landmark Supreme Court ruling.  In the case, the Supreme Court held that the group home in which the woman was living had a duty to exercise reasonable care in supervising its residents.
Read more . . .


Saturday, September 24, 2016

The Values of an Irrevocable Trust


Is an irrevocable trust a wise choice for you?

A trust fund is a legal setup in which three people are involved: the grantor, the beneficiary, and the trustee. The trustee is the person or organization responsible for making sure that the trust is administered as the grantor intended. There are many reasons for establishing trusts of various types, for example to prevent the risk of leaving a large sum of money to a child who may spend it recklessly.

In a great many cases, careful estate planning involves establishing one or more trusts. By choosing a Read more . . .


Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Threatened Reform of North Carolina’s Model Medicaid System


Who will be affected by proposed reforms to Medicaid law in North Carolina?

There is no shortage of political jokes, especially in an election year like this one. Politicians and government officials are often blamed for accomplishing nothing or criticized for enacting unpopular legislation. But the most frustrating thing is when a potentially disastrous change is proposed to a system that’s working fine—actually better than fine.

Such is the case with the proposed reform of North Carolina’s Medicaid law. Medicaid provides medical care to the poor, the majority of whom are children.
Read more . . .


Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Why You Need an Advance Directive: VA Doctors Participate in 'Adverse Events' Study


Discussing end-of-life issues is never easy. However, difficult medical scenarios can arise at a moment’s notice, and we believe all our clients should have a say – albeit via a healthcare power of attorney – in their treatment when facing a terminal or debilitating condition. An advance directive is a power of attorney drafted solely to address complex medical issues – and specifically pertains to the scenario in which you cannot advocate for yourself due to unconsciousness, injury or illness. As a component of the healthcare power of attorney – also known as an “Advance Directive” – an agent can make important end-of-life decisions, including their wishes with regard to resuscitation, life support and pain management.

We know that


Read more . . .


Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Elder Abuse on DOJ's Radar


What is the government doing about elder abuse.

Back in May, we reported on the growing problem of elder abuse in all its forms, physical, emotional and financial. Many have termed this the crime of the 21st century, and now elder abuse has become a concern for the federal government. The U.S.


Read more . . .


Sunday, July 24, 2016

Veteran’s Benefits Have Gone to the Dogs


Can a veteran qualify for a service dog?

In a world where veterans are often waiting for…or fighting for… various government- sponsored benefits, a “feel good” story about vets helping other vets takes the bite out of the daily depressing headlines.

The North Carolina-based organization, Canines for Service, provides service dogs to veterans who are disabled as a result of their military service. The dogs have all been rescued from shelters and, after being trained for 9-12 months to become service dogs, are placed free of charge with disabled vets from all over the country. Some of the veterans’ qualifying disabilities include mobility issues, documented post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and traumatic brain injuries. It’s common for the service dogs to assist their new owners for 8-10 years before retiring and being replaced.


Read more . . .


Wednesday, July 20, 2016

Startup Accelerator Committed to Charlotte


How can my business qualify for Well Fargo's Startup Accelerator?

Wells Fargo & Co launched its Startup Accelerator in 2014 to support technology entrepreneurs. During this time the bank has received applications from more than 800 applications from startups in 40 countries - companies involved in a wide range of technological innovations from cyber security and artificial intelligence to digital marketing and operations.

Based In San Francisco, Wells Fargo also has an east coast hub based in Charlotte, North Carolina, and the bank is providing investment opportunities to startups in the region, particularly those involved in financial technology or "fintech."

"Wells is committed to Charlotte. We have a big team, which makes it that much more of a complimentary place for startups already located there to get in touch with us,” said Braden More head of payment strategy at Wells Fargo.


Read more . . .


Wednesday, June 29, 2016

The “Epidemic” of Insufficient Retirement Savings Among Baby Boomers


Will I have enough money to live on after I retire?

If you’re a Baby Boomer facing retirement and aren’t sure if you’ll have enough money to support yourself for the rest of your life once you stop working, you aren’t alone. In fact, even if you think you’ve planned well for retirement, you may have underestimated. No one likes to think about getting older, becoming disabled, or dying, but it’s imperative to have your financial and legal affairs in order before retiring.

Financial experts suggest that retirees will need to replace 70% of their pre-retirement income to live during their retirement. Retirement income sources may include savings, investments, 401(k)s, IRAs, social security benefits, pensions, etc.


Read more . . .


Tuesday, June 28, 2016

Veterans Administration Inexplicably Cuts Benefits to Thousands in Need


In a dramatic and inexcusable case of administrative oversight, the Veterans Administration (VA) has allegedly suspended benefits for over 4,200 recipients in the past four years – all which were “presumed dead,” despite being very  much alive and well.

Late last year, a Florida lawmaker made an inquiry into the VA’s records, specifically seeking information on the number of terminations premised on “presumed demise.” The inquiry came after several of his constituents in the Tampa area complained about losing their benefits – and having to navigate a bureaucratic labyrinth to reinstate their rightful entitlements.

As a result of the inquiry, the VA revealed that over 1,000 terminations were occurring per year, all of which were erroneous. The highest number of errors occurred in 2015, 1,025 American veterans losing their monthly benefits after being wrongfully presumed dead.


Read more . . .


Thursday, June 16, 2016

How to Name a Trustee


What are the obligations of a trustee in managing an estate?

A well designed estate plan often requires putting a revocable trust in place which can help to avoid probate and specify how your beneficiaries will receive the assets. Once the trust is established, you will be named as the trustee so that you can continue to manage your assets during your lifetime. However, you will also need to designate a successor trustee who will be tasked with managing your financial affairs in the event you become incapacitated or distributing assets to your beneficiaries when pass away.


Read more . . .


Tuesday, June 7, 2016

Using Estate Planning to Prepare for the Unimaginable: The Death of Your Spouse


Should you plan for a time when your spouse predeceases you?

You love your spouse so much that it causes you great pain to think about his or her death. But, this pain is nothing compared to the agony you will face should your spouse predecease you without an estate plan in place. Estate planning can make dealing with the death of a spouse significantly easier by limiting the stress that may come with being unfamiliar with the family finances and your spouse’s wishes. Here is how to being planning for the possibility that your spouse will die first.

It is most important to be organized when it comes to estate planning.


Read more . . .


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Monk Law Firm, PLLC assists clients throughout Charlotte, Rock Hill, Fort Mill and the surrounding areas.



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| Phone: 803-594-4453
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| Phone: 704-369-9977

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